Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K Dick

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep by Philip K Dick

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep was a 1968 novel by Philip K Dick. The novel’s protagonist is Rick Deckard, a man who hunts sentient androids for profit on a ruined, irradiated earth where the majority of the population have emigrated to Mars. Animals are mostly extinct, and extremely valuable; Rick can only afford an electric sheep, not the real thing. The book explores the nature of the soul, the value of animals, and what constitutes a human being.

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Review: The Suicide of Rachel Foster

Review: The Suicide of Rachel Foster

The Suicide of Rachel Foster, by OneOOne Games and Daedalic Entertainment, is another work of interactive fiction. It centres around a woman called Nicole. She has returned to her family’s dilapidated, abandoned hotel to discharge her parents’ estate, and becomes trapped by a snowstorm. She is contacted by Irving on an old, modified cell phone. He claims to be a FEMA agent, on the line to look out for people trapped by the ‘atypical storm’.

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Review: Some Distant Memory, by Galvanic

Review: Some Distant Memory, by Galvanic

Some Distant Memory, by Galvanic Games and Way Down Deep, is an interactive story about a professor who is desperately searching for the Sunken City of Houston. She is accompanied by ARORA, an AI who can rebuilt memories from notes, letters and photographs. Throughout the game you are also in touch with your companion Commander Ti, from a nearby colony. Earth has been subsumed by the Bloom, an ecological disaster accompanied by terrible earthquakes.

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The Rose Rent, by Ellis Peters

The Rose Rent, by Ellis Peters

I’ve always had a soft spot for the Cadfael books by Ellis Peters (Edith Mary Pargeter OBE BEM). The Rose Rent is a classic. It is a medieval mystery novel set in the summer of 1142, as the battle between King Stephen and Empress Maud rages on. This is the thirteenth novel in The Cadfael Chronicles, first published in 1986. It charts a wealthy young widow who donates a house to the Abbey for a symbolic rent of a single white rose a year.

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An Artist of the Floating World, by Kazuo Ishiguru

An Artist of the Floating World, by Kazuo Ishiguru

An Artist of the Floating World, by Kazuo Ishiguro, is a beautiful, hazy portrait of life in post war Japan. It explores generational tension, changing social mores, guilt and atonement. It is also another excellent example of the unreliable narrator, a trope of Ishiguro’s work.

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Time Out of Joint by Philip K Dick

Time Out of Joint by Philip K Dick

Ragle Gumm is an ordinary man lives with his sister’s family in a sleepy suburban 1950s town. He makes a living by winning a newspaper contest over and over again. He dallies with his neighbour and plots where the Little Green Man will be Next, but starts to realise all is not well. This is how Time out of Joint, by Philip K Dick, begins.

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What Remains of Edith Finch, by Ian Dallas

What Remains of Edith Finch, by Ian Dallas

What Remains of Edith Finch is a beautiful, haunting tale exploring the death and tragedy surrounding the Finch family.

Edith has returned to her family’s abandoned home off the coast of the state of Washington following her mother’s death. The tale shows Edith discovering their history through exploration of sealed bedrooms / shrines, all with voyeuristic peepholes.

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Affinity, by Sarah Waters

Affinity, by Sarah Waters

An interweaving tale of two entrapped women; a suicidal noblewoman with no purpose and an imprisoned spiritualist claiming innocence. Reality, voice and oppression – not to mention manipulation – are the key themes in this stunning lesbian Victorian ghost story. A rich, beautiful, haunting novel by an excellent author, set in the late 19th century.

Spoilers ahead.

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Tin Can Cook by Jack Monroe

Tin Can Cook by Jack Monroe

Unusually, I got the Kindle version of Tin Can Cook. I tend to have my phone handy when cooking so I figured it would be appropriate. So far, it’s introduced me to the joys of tinned potatoes (9/10 most of a fresh bag will end up in the compost before we use it).

FYI, if you want to start composting, this site does cheap, subsidised bins – https://getcomposting.com

I have a real soft spot for Jack Monroe, for a very practical reason. The recipes on the Cooking on a Bootstrap website helped me when I was seriously struggling financially. Put it this way; I wasn’t visiting a food bank, but maybe I should have been.

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